ART in MATHEMATICS, PHYSICS AND ENGINEERING

Unnoticed by all patent and copyright lawyers (since if it isn't written by a lawyer, it is irrelevant), and most artists and entertainers (who, like the lawyers, tend to avoid mathematics), is the fact that thousands of mathematicians, physicists and engineers around the world, for many years in the past, and throughout this century, are developing theories and techniques to subsume all of art and entertainment into the worlds of mathematics and physics. Tens of thousands of pages of such research has been and is being written.

A quote from Herbert Franke in John Barrow's fascinating book, The Artful Universe, clearly states what happens if the scientists succeed:

The demystification of art is one of the most far-reaching effects of the use of computers in the arts. No sooner is it recognized that the creation of art can be formalized, programmed and subjected to mathematical treatment, than all those secrets that used to enshround art vanish. Similarly with the reception of art; the description of reality in rational terms inevitably leads away from the irrational modes of thought, such as the idea that art causes effects that cannot be described scientifically, or that information is passed on to the public by the artist that could not be expressed in any other way. And so art loses its function as a substitute for faith, which it still fulfills here and there.

Further, the subsumption of art into science would please the Founding Fathers of the United States and their views of America as a place to advance science. Gerald Piel in a 5 September 1986 article in Science writes, "The natural philosophers who wrote the U.S social contract held the advancement of science to be the supreme exercise of citizen sovereignty." Piel quotes philosopher Alfred North Whitehead, "...The essence of freedom is the practicability of purpose ... The literary exposition of freedom deals mainly with its frills. The Greek myth is more to the point. Prometheus did not bring to mankind the freedom of the press. He procured fire ...."

Piel also quotes Thomas Jefferson, who authored the First Amendment establishing freedom of speech and the press AFTER Jefferson and others had written the Constitution establishing the patent system:

It is impossible for a man who takes a survey of what is already known, not to see what an immensity in every branch of science remains to be discovered ... great fields are yet to be explored to which our faculties are equal, and that to an extent of which we cannot fix the limits ... while the art of printing is left to us, science can never be retrograde; what is once acquired of real knowledge can never be lost. To preserve the freedom of the human mind then and freedom of the press, every spirit should be ready to devote itself to martyrdom; for as long as we may think as we will, and speak as we think, the condition of man will proceed in improvement.

Were Thomas Jefferson alive today, and able to see the advances of science, he too would concur that the "advancement of science" should expand to cover the art and entertainment world, science to be protected by the patent system created in the very first Article of the Constitution, a patent system to protect and reward this supreme exercise of citizen sovereignty.


Eighteen months or so from now, the content at this Web site will be expanded by an order of magnitude, when we gather and organize information on these scientific pursuits to subsume art and entertainment. For those companies who don't want to wait, we are selling a comprehensive report of these pursuits and the effects on all industries for $100,000. Please contact Greg Aharonian at 415-981-0441 for more information. If you don't want to pay this amount, go do the research yourself.


As a tiny sample of these pursuits, here are some leads to articles in a variety of scientific publications.